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Deer hunting license. 
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Joined: 31 Mar 2009 09:03
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Post Deer hunting license.
Anyone know what's happening with the deer hunting license, I heard you will have to pay for it and something about we will have to do a course and pay for it. Anyone hear anything about this.


19 May 2017 01:15
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Post Re: Deer hunting license.
It would be for FCP delegates to inform the membership, if proposals to ammend the WILDLIFE ACTS 1976 TO 2012 – SECTION 29(1) - was about to be recommended?

Then again there are always surprise agendas looking for extra fee paying courses...
Attachment:
deer-hunting-application-form-2017.pdf [98.98 KiB]
Downloaded 15 times



https://nargc.ie/proposed-changes-to-ni ... -shooting/
Quote:


Proposed changes to Night Time Hunting – Shooting

The National Association of Regional Game Councils (NARGC) were represented at the Firearms Consultative Panel (FCP) Meeting on the 20th April 2017, by our National Chairman Michael Fenlon, and Compensation Fund Administrator, Chris Gavican. We believe that we received a place at the table just in time to temporarily stop proposed changes that would substantially diminish our traditional sporting rights.

There were many items on the agenda, but the issue of night shooting dominated the Meeting.

A report from the National Parks & Wildlife Services (NPWS), compiled with the help of a working group, which included the Sports Coalition (SC), was presented to the Meeting for its approval.

There were 21 persons sitting around the FCP table, representing 14 organisations, but it was astonishing that so few of them represented or advanced the position of the ordinary Hunting / Shooting / Gun Club person.

In fact quite a bit of what is proposed shows a distinct lack of understanding of the countryside, and the interventions that are necessary to maintain a healthy balance of nature.

The only other groups present that supported our stance in relation to the reality of country life were the IFA, Countryside Alliance and the Wild Deer Association.

After a robust debate, where the NARGC and the other groups highlighted various problems and deficiencies in the Report, and the serious repercussions these proposed changes would have, if implemented, the Chairperson of the FCP asked us to make a submission to the FCP before the 1.6.2017, outlining our position on these issues.

This is your opportunity to have your say on this.


What happened to the 2014 review of firearms. In the intervening three years, has the terms and conditions changed from what the review was supposed to be about.
Legislative proposals on handguns and certain types of semi-automatic shotguns and rifles. As well as the DoJ working group proposal to change the explosive act of 1875, in order to make justifiable 'exemption' for license holders wishing to reload centerfire ammunition.

What other advanced progress of the 2014 firearms review has been made behind the scenes, expanded to include the many grey areas of the firearms act 2009...also outside the remit of the original review proposal, signed in 2014 by former Justice Minister, Alan Shatter.
Attachment:
2014 Minister%20for%20Justice.jpg
2014 Minister%20for%20Justice.jpg [ 73.19 KiB | Viewed 277 times ]





North of Ireland Guidelines include for example: "Zeroing might also include training and testing, whether on a rifle range or other suitable land".

Quote:
Legal Grey Area (aka) “damp grey spot at the back of a cell”

Michael McDowell when he was minister for justice, introduced what in legal terms was best described as another grey area into the 2006 firearms act.
The act of sighting and practicing with a rifle (zeroing) when not carried-out on authorised ranges (few) may be illegal or open to an interpretation by local Gardaí. The then Justice Minister was reported to have said after the act became law - his intention
was not to ban zeroing / sighting for a rifle. Nowhere it seems does the Act state in clear language the intention of what the law meant with regard to the Minister's follow-up opinion.

It could be argued that the responsible hunter regularly tests a rifle for accuracy and for example, on purchasing a new rifle to sight it in at a safe testing place, usually a familiar location used by the hunter over a very long time.
It would be hard to determine a location used for sighting a rifle and compare it with target shooting at an approved commercial range, which has a club membership engaged in the sport of target shooting.
To expect a hunter to apply for planning permission on land they use for zeroing, simply for the privilege of being a responsible firearms' owner, in many ways, overlooks the importance of the safety aspect above anything else. The Inspector of Ranges in such a situation can consider the zeroing area safe to use, to have the site listed as an offical firing range, costing €1,000 every five years,
another - Grey Area?

There are No grey areas in the firearms code found in the North of Ireland. Practice is necessary with any suitable target you prefer - i.e. Grid 1" good for zeroing, bullseye target.. as it once was, south of the border, previous to the firearms act, 2009



Advanced the position on rifle calibres over .308" /7.62mm - that remain non restricted in every other EU country...


20 May 2017 18:30
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Joined: 07 Jan 2013 10:12
Posts: 124
Post Re: Deer hunting license.
Sikamick wrote:
Anyone know what's happening with the deer hunting license, I heard you will have to pay for it and something about we will have to do a course and pay for it. Anyone hear anything about this.


Department of Agriculture published a report entitled "Deer Management in Ireland – A Framework for Action”
An Irish Deer Management Forum has been established to implement the various actions listed in the report. The Forum itself comprises representatives from the main stakeholder areas, such as landowners, forestry, hunting and conservation organisations, as well as representatives from both Departments https://www.npws.ie/sites/default/files ... 202015.pdf


22 May 2017 12:28
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Joined: 12 Aug 2011 12:56
Posts: 317
Post Re: Deer hunting license.
Sounds like building a better mousetrap based on another massive amounts of regulation to do something that's already long been done £££ :mrgreen: https://youtu.be/Biu7bJAfVNI


25 May 2017 18:35
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Post Re: Deer hunting license.
Quote:
There were 21 persons sitting around the FCP table, representing 14 organisations, but it was astonishing that so few of them represented or advanced the position of the ordinary Hunting / Shooting / Gun Club person.
In fact quite a bit of what is proposed shows a distinct lack of understanding of the countryside, and the interventions that are necessary to maintain a healthy balance of nature.

The only other groups present that supported our stance in relation to the reality of country life were the IFA, Countryside Alliance and the Wild Deer Association.

This does nothing to advanced the position of the ordinary Hunter / Shooting / Gun Club person.


New batch of proposed - regulations and courses, are you surprised.. Many of the 21 FCP stakeholders are more than a little familiar with the wildlife code on the island of Ireland, England, Wales and Scotland, where a similar hunting environment has an understanding of the countryside and the tradition of 'mentoring novice hunters' through the various aspects of stalking, taught without need for fee paying courses, hosted at a (few) target shooting ranges. There always is the option of taking a fee paying course, where for example, the novice comes from a non-hunting background. Proposals are for expanding bureaucracy to fullfill the needs of the expanding bureaucracy, where for FREE, best practice codes are openly available. Example of Irish adapted Canadian target shooting range regulations.

http://www.thedeerinitiative.co.uk/best ... elfare.php

https://basc.org.uk/cop/deer-stalking/

Quote:
Zeroing the rifle (traditional no-range practice )
To ensure safe and humane shooting, you must practice and maintain your skill with the rifle and appropriate stalking ammunition and must check at regular intervals that your rifle is still zeroed correctly – i.e., that the bullet is striking a selected point of aim at a chosen range.

The rifle must be test-fired and the zero verified or corrected after a knock or other impact, or after any unaccountably wild shot. Also, when a new batch of ammunition is to be used or the rifle has not been shot for a prolonged period, ensure that the rifle is still zeroed correctly. No one should continue stalking in such a case until zeroing (or sighting-in) has been done.
While zeroing the rifle, it may be beneficial to practice shooting at short range to simulate a humane dispatch shot to ensure that you are aware of any aim-off allowance at short range.



An Irish vegetable grower for example, farming over 50 acres - pestered by deer, requires an additional 50 acres to apply for a stalking license in Ireland - regardless if they can safely shoot over 50 acres (larger acreage, where in theory - 10 acres strip of land can fit a 300 yard rifle range ...

Quote:

DSC1 or Mentoring Conditions
http://www.shootinguk.co.uk/shooting/de ... talk-88547

Qualification needed to stalk?

You do not by law need any qualifications to shoot deer. The law only requires the DSC1 (Deer Stalking Certificate) or DSC2 qualifications if you want to sell venison to a game dealer. DSC1 is a sensible qualification to ask for if you have no other way of establishing competence.

Some forces will insist you have a mentor depending on the area you live. It seems the more rural you are the less restrictions that will apply. If you don't have anyone who can mentor you then your FEO might know someone suitable who you can contact. There is nothing in the firearms law that says you need a mentor.

I don't think you'll find anywhere in the HO Guidance to police that there is a minimum acreage requirement that has to be met before a FAC is granted. How big is the area you have and are the species you are intending to shoot present on that land?

It's all down to you having good reason to possess that particular firearm, and part of that is to demonstrate that you can shoot safely on the land that you nominate - it should only therefore form part of the police's assessment procedure to help them make the decision that you have 'good reason'.


02 Jun 2017 13:17
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