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Licensing, Semi-Automatic, Centerfire Rifles in Ireland 
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Joined: 25 Feb 2009 15:26
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Post Re: Licensing an M14.
I'm John
PM sent with my details

JK


28 Jun 2011 08:45
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Joined: 06 Jun 2009 09:39
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Post Re: Licensing an M14.
HI & welcome to the forum.

Now as the lads have said it's possible to licence these kind of rifle but they can be a bit harder to get a licence for as we have a system here where it depends on your Chief Supers opinions and worst case scenario the depth of your pockets :roll:

For a rifle like this you will need to have a deer hunting permit or membership of a Garda authorised rifle range. Deer hunting permit is free if you can get required permissions for landowners with deer on their land. Membership of a rifle range with the facilities to cover this type of rifle may cost you as much as €600 in the first year and €300 per year thereafter depending on where you join. There are afaik no more than a few ranges in the Republic that can cater for this type of rifle.

Home security wise according to the law you'll require an approved gun safe to be installed in your home. However, due to the fact it's a restricted firearm I wouldn't be surprised if the Chief Super insisted on a monitored alram system installed by & monitired by an approved installer. This would be more than the "guidelines" state you'd require but Garda have the right to ask for more if they deem it necessary.

You may also have to do a competency course if the Garda won't accept your previous experience as suitable to prove same.

Welcome to the Irish way of doing things :shock:


28 Jun 2011 11:59
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Post Re: Licensing an M14.
You might want to handle a m14 before you buy one , i seen one and its a heavy old beast especially the action.


28 Jun 2011 15:29
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Post Re: Licensing an M14.
rowa2 wrote:
You might want to handle a m14 before you buy one , i seen one and its a heavy old beast especially the action.


The problem with that is there rare in these parts, I only know of 2 in the country.


28 Jun 2011 15:36
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Post Re: Licensing an M14.
Springfield Armory offer the M1A to civilians in two variants - standard & super match grade semi-auto only rifles, similar rifles to the select-fire military M14. They are one of a few gun builders that make from time to time, copies of the M1 Garand WWII battle rifle. As far as I know, several European countries import these rifles, therefore parts should be readily available for them.

LRB Arms M14SA & Poly technology M14/S offer re-built semi "auto receiver" Sporter conversions.

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Quote:
Springfield Armory M1A Features
Springfield's M1A is offered in a number of variations, from the basic GI style rifle to the Super Match. Each is meant for a specific purpose, and for a specific budget.

The most immediately noticeable difference between the models is the stocks. The National Match has a heavy walnut stock that's a deep reddish-brown color. The weight of the stock makes it more appropriate for match shooting than for carrying in the field. The camouflage synthetic stock is light weight but sturdy, lending itself to carry in the woods and field. The black synthetic stock is strong and light weight as well and, like the camouflage stock, is less expensive than the wood-stocked models

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The walnut stock found on the standard M1A models is as close as you can get to a real M14. It makes the rifle weigh almost a pound less than the national match stock, but still helps deliver outstanding performance.

M1A Receiver
The first time you pick up an M1A, you'll be struck by its weight. For those who are used to handling rifles with forged or stamped receivers, the M1A comes as almost a shock. It has a receiver that's investment cast steel. Tolerances between the receiver, bolt, activation rod, and other parts is tight, which is one reason for the M1A's superb accuracy. It's a rifle that will last for decades, and go tens of thousands of rounds without showing signs of wear.

M1A Sights
Springfield Armory's M1A rifles come with a front post sight with "ears" to protect it, and a rear aperture sight. The rear sight is adjustable for windage and elevation via knobs on the left and right sides of the sight. The standard rear sight has one MOA ("Minute Of Angle") adjustments. The National Match rear sight has 1/2 MOA adjustments, and is built to tighter specifications for increased accuracy. The National Match rear sight also has a hood to protect the aperture and shield it from light reflections.

Barrels
Springfield Armory makes a number of different barrels for the M1A. The National Match M1A uses an air-gauged 22" stainless steel or parkerized chrome moly steel barrel, giving the rifle a bit more accuracy than the standard model. For the Super Match M1A, Springfield doesn't use their own barrels, but instead uses custom Douglas stainless steel barrels.

The Loaded models use the standard carbon steel or stainless steel barrels, just like the Standard M1A models.

The National Match and Super Match rifles have the barrels glass-bedded in the receiver.

The Scout Squad M1A uses an 18" steel barrel with a muzzle stabilizer designed specifically for that rifle. The SOCOM rifles have 16" barrels, the shortest allowed by law without having to register for a short-barreled rifle.
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A Brief History of the M14 and M1A
Following World War II, the US military sought to replace the M1 Garand, which was the GI's main battle rifle, with a rifle that could do it all: have the accuracy of the M1 Garand, the lighter carry of the M1 carbine, and the rapid fire of the M3 (the "Grease Gun") and the BAR (Browning Automatic Rifle).

Springfield Armory began the design of such a rifle in the 1950's, starting with the .30-06 cartridge used in the M1 Garand, and modifying it to make it lighter, but still as powerful. The result was the 7.62 NATO cartridge.

The military tested many guns, and settled on Springfield Armory's new cartridge and rifle, designating the rifle as the M14.

The first rifles were delivered to troops in 1959. By the time the Army and Marine Corps had completed their orders, Springfield Armory wound up producing nearly 1.4 million M14's.

Vietnam was the test of the M14, and results were mixed. The 7.62 NATO round was very good for penetrating brush. The M14 also excelled at long-distance shots. In the humid jungle, though, the wood stock proved to be a liability, as swelling from moisture affected accuracy.

The plan to have a battle rifle that was also fully automatic proved to be less than desirable, as the relatively powerful 7.62 cartridge had far too much recoil to be controllable under full-auto fire. Most M14's were subsequently modified for semi-automatic use only. (The wood stocks from the converted rifles have a cutout in them for the selector lever, just below the receiver on the right side, but the lever was removed).

By the mid-1960's the M16 had been fully developed, and proved to be more suitable for jungle warfare. The M14 was no longer the standard issue rifle, and was "demoted" to the status of Limited Standard rifle.

The M14 continued to see use by troops stationed in Europe, and was still prized by many soldiers in Vietnam who didn't think the M16's 5.56 cartridge had enough "oomph".

The M14 was converted by the Army into the M21 sniper rifle, a role the rifle filled until 1988.

While the M16 and then the M4 rifles became the mainstay for US forces, the M14 continues to this day to be used not only for training, but also as sniper and "designated marksman rifles", and has been used in both Afghanistan and Iraq.

Despite its relatively short career as a standard issue rifle, the M14 has been the longest-serving rifle in the US infantry.

With the M14 orders completed, Springfield Armory of Massachussetts, which had produced firearms for the military for decades, closed in 1968. LH Manufacturing in Texas adopted the Springfield Armory name in 1974.

The commercial Springfield Armory company turned to making a civilian, semi-automatic-only version of the M14, naming it the M1A. The earliest models of the M1A used surplus GI parts until Springfield Armory began producing the rifle using parts that were made entirely in house. You'll sometimes encounter the early models at gun shows, identifiable by the selector lever cut-out in the stock.

The Springfield Armory M1A is nearly identical to the M14 that the company made for the military, with the lack of full-auto capability being the most significant difference.

Over forty years later, the M14/M1A is still one of the most sought-after military style rifles, and continues to be one of the most accurate military rifles ever produced.


05 Aug 2011 13:21
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Post RESTRICTED
Hi lads, sounds thick of me to say but is the m1 really restricted but it could be wrong. Ray


Assault rifles, or rifles that resemble assault rifles is restricted , what is not restricted are all rifles (single shot, semi auto and bolt action) up to and including .308 (7.62 millimetres) and whose overall length is greater than 90 centimetres.


30 Nov 2011 12:38
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Joined: 05 Oct 2009 19:56
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Post Re: RESTRICTED
Hi Rayfn,

M1s (both grands and carbines) are restricted because they are semi automatic centerfire rifles.

The only type of semi auto that isnt restricted are rimfires that have a magazine capacity of 10 or less rounds Eg ruger 10/22 with a standard factory mag. Should you put a magazine with higher capacity than 10 on the 10/22 it becomes restricted.

As for length..... a centerfire longarm (rifle/shotgun) becomes restricted when its barrel is shorter than 30 cm and its overall length is shorter than 60 cm because under irish law because it is then classed as a short arm (pistol). Should a rimfire rifle be that short it would be classed as an unrestrictred pistol as long as its magazine capacity was 5 or less.

I hope that helps.

GH


30 Nov 2011 13:19
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Post Re: fcp
Quote:
6. RESTRICTED LIST:
The long awaited Statutory Instrument (S.I. 21 of 2008) on restricted firearms was finally signed by the Minister on 12th of February 2008. It must be emphasised that restricted firearms MAY BE LICENSED!! They will be authorised by an officer of higher rank than a Superintendent who is nominated by the Garda Commissioner.

What is not restricted:
Short firearms capable of firing only blank ammunition.
Shotguns capable of carrying not more than 3 cartridges (plugged).
All rifles (single shot, semi auto and bolt action) up to and including .308 (7.62 millimetres) and whose overall length is greater than 90 centimetres.
Single-shot, repeating or semi-automatic rim-fire firearms designed to fire rim-fire percussion ammunition and with a magazine having a capacity of not more than 10 rounds.
Air operated rifled or smoothbore long firearms.
Pistols of calibres .177 air and .22 designed for use in Olympic competition.
Silencers for long rifled rim-fire firearms.

What is restricted: (This is not an exhaustive list)
Shotguns with magazines capable of carrying more than three cartridges.
Shotguns with individual pistol grips (as opposed to normal stocks), folding or telescopic stocks.
Shotguns with a barrel length less than 60.9 centimetres (24 inches).
Assault rifles, or rifles that resemble assault rifles.
Rifles of bull pup design.
Rifles with magazines which carry more than 10 cartridges.
All handguns other than .177 air and .22 used in Olympic competition.
Slug ammunition for shotguns.
Grenades, bombs and other similar missiles.
Accelerator, incendiary or sabot ammunition.
Ammunition for restricted or prohibited firearms.
Moderators (silencers) for firearms larger than .22 calibre.

It is now hoped that the Panel will shortly be able to roll out the timescale for the introduction of all phases of the new Licensing Code.



What is not restricted:
Short firearms capable of firing only blank ammunition.
Shotguns capable of carrying not more than 3 cartridges (plugged).
All rifles (single shot, semi auto and bolt action up to and including .308 (7.62 millimetres) and whose overall length is greater than 90 centimetres.

Interesting section....


30 Nov 2011 13:26
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Post Re: RESTRICTED
What is not restricted:

All rifles (single shot, semi auto and bolt action) up to and including .308 (7.62 millimetres) and whose overall length is greater than 90 centimetres.


M1 Garand :o :shock:

Sikamick


30 Nov 2011 14:05
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Post Re: m1 garand licence
Quote:
M1s (both grands and carbines) are restricted because they are semi automatic centerfire rifles.


The M1 Garand is a proper service rifle built before the invention of the assault rifle. Firearms dealer with the knowledge (JK ) should be able to advise your local Gardai. Otherwise from what I understand, one or two Garands are indeed licensed as non restricted firearms - provided your superintendent can be persuade to accept what the SI apparently means and not what they say it means. http://www.sff.net/people/sanders/ar.html

Assault rifles are select fire ( full auto ) designed around a cartridge intermediate in power between pistol and full-power rifle rounds, shorter in length than typical service rifles. Examples - AK47 - M16

Hunting Semi auto Rifles
Browning Automatic Rifle (BAR) autoloading centerfire hunting rifles.
Benelli R1 semi-automatic hunting rifle
http://www.benelli.it/Articoli/Famiglie.asp?IDTipo=4

The Firearms Policy Unit (unit) advise the Gardai. http://www.ssai.ie/Presentation%20by%20 ... 20Unit.pdf


30 Nov 2011 18:59
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Post Re: m1 garand licence
S/A Semi Automatic are restricted I'm Afraid
S.I. No. 21 of 2008
————————
FIREARMS (RESTRICTED FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION) ORDER
2008
Paragraph 4
(1) Firearms other than those to which subparagraph (2) relates are
declared to be restricted firearms for the purposes of the Act:

(2) This subparagraph relates to the following firearms:
(a) single-shot or repeating short firearms capable of discharging only
blank ammunition;

(b) shotguns manufactured, adapted or modified so as to render them
incapable of containing more than 3 cartridges, but not to shotguns—
(i) with a detached, folding or telescopic stock, or
(ii) with a pistol grip, or
(iii) whose barrel is less than 60.9 centimetres (24 inches) in length;

(c) the following long firearms (not being assault rifles or bullpup rifles):
(i) single-shot or repeating rifled centre-fire firearms of a calibre not
exceeding 7.62 millimetres (.308 inch) and whose overall length
is greater than 90 centimetres,
(ii) single-shot, repeating or semi-automatic rim-fire firearms
designed to fire rim-fire percussion ammunition and with a magazine
having a capacity of not more than 10 rounds,

(iii) air-operated rifled or smoothbore firearms;

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The SI doesn't state "All rifles (single shot, semi auto and bolt action) " it states "the following long firearms (not being assault rifles or bullpup rifles)" and lists single-shot or repeating (manually operated) rifled centre-fire firearms
This makes the distinction in my opinion

John


30 Nov 2011 20:58
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Post Re: m1 garand licence
What is not restricted:Short firearms capable of firing only blank ammunition.
Shotguns capable of carrying not more than 3 cartridges (plugged).
All rifles (single shot, semi auto and bolt action up to and including .308 (7.62 millimetres) and whose overall length is greater than 90 centimetres.


30 Nov 2011 21:12
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Post Re: m1 garand licence
John please read section 6 from the link below, has ICPSA got it wrong.


http://www.icpsa.ie/notices/631-firearm ... panel.html

What is not restricted:Short firearms capable of firing only blank ammunition.
Shotguns capable of carrying not more than 3 cartridges (plugged).

All rifles (single shot, semi auto and bolt action) up to and including .308 (7.62 millimetres) and whose overall length is greater than 90 centimetres.

Single-shot, repeating or semi-automatic rim-fire firearms designed to fire rim-fire percussion ammunition and with a magazine having a capacity of not more than 10 rounds.

Air operated rifled or smoothbore long firearms.
Pistols of calibres .177 air and .22 designed for use in Olympic competition.
Silencers for long rifled rim-fire firearms.


What is restricted: (This is not an exhaustive list)

Shotguns with magazines capable of carrying more than three cartridges.
Shotguns with individual pistol grips (as opposed to normal stocks), folding or telescopic stocks.
Shotguns with a barrel length less than 60.9 centimetres (24 inches).
Assault rifles, or rifles that resemble assault rifles.
Rifles of bull pup design.
Rifles with magazines which carry more than 10 cartridges.
All handguns other than .177 air and .22 used in Olympic competition.
Slug ammunition for shotguns.
Grenades, bombs and other similar missiles.
Accelerator, incendiary or sabot ammunition.
Ammunition for restricted or prohibited firearms.
Moderators (silencers) for firearms larger than .22 calibre.


30 Nov 2011 21:19
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Post Re: m1 garand licence
What is not restricted:
Short firearms capable of firing only blank ammunition. Unrestricted according to the SI
Shotguns capable of carrying not more than 3 cartridges (plugged)Unrestricted according to the SI

All rifles (Nope) (single shot (yep), semi auto (rimfire only) and bolt action up to and including .308 (7.62 millimetres) and whose overall length is greater than 90 centimetres.

Rimfire semiautomatic rifles with a magazine capacity of 10 rounds or less are according to the SI unrestricted.

Sika, Can answer if the ICPSA is wrong or not but the Irish Statue book http://www.irishstatutebook.ie/2008/en/si/0021.html does not list the words "All rifles (single shot, semi auto and bolt action) "

Instead it makes the very clear distinction on the Semi Automatic rifles being Rimfire

"(c) the following long firearms (not being assault rifles or bullpup rifles):
(i) single-shot or repeating rifled centre-fire firearms of a calibre not
exceeding 7.62 millimetres (.308 inch) and whose overall length
is greater than 90 centimetres,

(ii) single-shot, repeating or semi-automatic rim-fire firearms
designed to fire rim-fire percussion ammunition and with a magazine
having a capacity of not more than 10 rounds,"

To me the SI states that all Centre-fire Semi Automatic rifles are restricted

JK


30 Nov 2011 21:26
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Post Re: m1 garand licence
John if you look at the ICPSA link as against what it say’s in the SI some one in the ICPSA defiantly got it wrong.

Heading
FIREARMS (RESTRICTED FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION) ORDER 2008

Very confusing: Why the need under this heading to put in non-restricted firearms.

Quote[kavanjoh]
Instead it makes the very clear distinction on the Semi Automatic rifles being Rimfire

"(c) the following long firearms (not being assault rifles or bullpup rifles):
(i) single-shot or repeating rifled centre-fire firearms of a calibre not
exceeding 7.62 millimetres (.308 inch) and whose overall length
is greater than 90 centimetres,

(ii) single-shot, repeating or semi-automatic rim-fire firearms
designed to fire rim-fire percussion ammunition and with a magazine
having a capacity of not more than 10 rounds,"


Sikamick


30 Nov 2011 21:48
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Joined: 17 Mar 2010 19:31
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Location: Harold Hill,England
Post Re: m1 garand licence
Further info from page 1. My friend in Denmark now has a Beretta made M1 Garand, up rated to Danish Army specification. In order to licence it in Denmark. This rifle must be modified to single shot, thus the gas tube is removed. He also shoots a K98,SMLE, No5 and a M1 carbine.
Kind regards, Lester


30 Nov 2011 21:58
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Joined: 14 Nov 2009 13:21
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Post Re: m1 garand licence
Icpsa know I taught, bad luck so. Ray


01 Dec 2011 08:55
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Post Re: m1 garand licence
LesterH wrote:
Further info from page 1. My friend in Denmark now has a Beretta made M1 Garand, up rated to Danish Army specification. In order to licence it in Denmark. This rifle must be modified to single shot, thus the gas tube is removed. He also shoots a K98,SMLE, No5 and a M1 carbine.
Kind regards, Lester


Thanks all the same but I think single shot M1 wouldnt be real. Ray


01 Dec 2011 09:52
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Post Re: m1 garand licence
Rayfn wrote:
Icpsa know I taught, bad luck so. Ray


_______________________________________________________________

It looks like a patch and paste error on the ICPSA website, by the way Rayfn restricted doesn’t mean banned. There are semi-auto full- bore rifles licensed here ROI.

Sikamick


01 Dec 2011 11:12
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Post Re: m1 garand licence
Rafyn, I would sooner own a single shot Garand than my present D/A one! :)


02 Dec 2011 16:47
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