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Firearms Training and Sporting Range Regulations 
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Post Firearms Training and Sporting Range Regulations
ISSF / Olympic shooting rules run into many pages- anti-doping to range design specifications. Even the number of endorsement logos permitted on jackets and equipement is strictly controlled. As an example, specific target center heights are laid-out from range floor to target centers in section 6.3.9. Southern Irish ranges now regulated under an adopted Canadian type regulation may incorporate ground baffling. To adhere to international shooting regulations fully, careful measuring is advisable. A shooting platform that's "vibration free" approved by ISSF officials, appears a practical solution if adjustments to shoot prone are needed. A corresponding increase in certain baffle heights may occur while keeping at the same time stipulated international target heights.

http://www.britishpistolclub.org/ISSF/2 ... rd_all.pdf

6.3.9 Height of Target Center (Center of the Ten Ring)
The center of the targets must be within the following heights when
measured from the level of the floor of the firing point:
Standard Height Variation Allowable
300 m ranges 3.00 m +/- 4.00 m
50 m ranges 0.75 m +/- 0.50 m
25 m ranges 1.40 m +/- 0.10 m
10 m ranges 1.40 m +/- 0.05 m
50 m Running Target 1.40 m +/- 0.20 m
10 m Running Target 1.40 m +/- 0.05 m
All target centers within a group of targets or range must have the
same height (±1 cm).
6.3.10 Horizontal Variations for Target Centers on 300 m, 50 m and
10 m Rifle and Pistol Range
6.3.10.1 Target centers at 300 m, 50 m, and 10 m must be oriented on the
center of the corresponding firing point. Horizontal deviations from a
center line drawn perpendicular (90 degrees) to the center of the
firing point are:
Maximum variation from center in either
direction
300 m rifle 6.00 m
50 m rifle/pistol 0.75 m
10 m rifle/pistol 0.25 m


09 Sep 2012 21:01
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Post Re: Firearms Training and Sporting Range Regulations
Black Adder I hope this is in the right thread, a chap had put it up on Boards.ie (Do you know where your muzzle is pointing?) and I think it's important for safety when target shooting as much as hunting, know your back stop and what's behind it.


http://bulletin.accurateshooter.com/201 ... jectories/


Sikamick


11 Sep 2012 00:21
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Post Re: Firearms Training and Sporting Range Regulations
Quote:
Black Adder I hope this is in the right thread

Issf/Oylmpic regulations.

Quote:
a chap had put it up on Boards.ie (Do you know where your muzzle is pointing?)

Good advice. Knowing where your muzzle is directed at all times and what lies behind the backstop before closing the action while at the same time aiming the firearm is advisable.

Maintaining safety standards in an urban setting at the recent London Olympic was achieved. Even the best shot in the world has an occasional off-day. Ranges should be designed in such a way as to account for all possibilities. The Olympic range below shows no-blue-sky with baffles placed overhead. An absorbent traditional graded-clay grass surface, with no-ricochet value, between muzzle & target, helps in preventing unintended errors. A fullbore rifle ranges has either a no danger zone area behind the backstop or fits into a range templet with specifications spefically for it. Dunnyboe in N.Ireland as an example, has 7 miles of a clearance behind the target bay, making it ideal for extended long range target shooting. Military ranges often are found situated close to the base of mountains - no danger range. In other jurisdictions because of their inherent safety values military firing ranges allow for civilian use.

Basic firearms training for hunting in the field with firearms is a good idea. Many variables exist which can trip-up the inexperienced. Unlike target shooting at a supervised range, it's up to the hunter in the field to decide when and where they shoot. Awareness of what lies beyond the game they shoot at and surfaces they hunt over is essential. Rough ground with hidden hard surfaces next to game can result in a miss or an unintended ricochet. If they loose their footing it increases the chance of making an accendental discharge firing with more elevation or in the wrong direction. Preferably supervised training at a range is recommended.

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11 Sep 2012 14:56
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Post Re: Firearms Training and Sporting Range Regulations
Sikamick wrote:
(Do you know where your muzzle is pointing?)


as the actress said to the bishop :D :D


11 Sep 2012 20:44
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Post Re: Firearms Training and Sporting Range Regulations
Just like to point out a couple of things here, following on the safety aspect of this thread and the recent London Olympic games.

1. No rifles other than .22 were used - all indoors on specially built ranges that are shortly to be totaly demolished - £25Million to build and £15Million to demolish.

2. The shotgun venue involved the closing and re-routing of a number of public bus services and also of an emergency amubulance route to and from the nearby hospital while shooting was in progress.

3. ALL of this could have been accomplished at Bisley with no modifications to the facilities there.

4. The adoption by the Irish government of certain details of Canadian ranges is total garbage - as anyone can see by looking in the archives, Canadian ranges do not have ground baffles - a totally needless and unnecessary expense. Please show me where the ground baffles are located on the range in the image above?

tac


12 Sep 2012 08:30
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Post Re: Firearms Training and Sporting Range Regulations
Sorry tac but point 3 there is wrong. You would have to had to rebuild the LRC to host the Games at Bisley, the floor vibrates too much, it doesn't have the spectator areas, and it's not up to the standard required for the World Championships or the Games in several other areas as well. And the financial cost associated with that new range would have broken the NSRA (it's killing them just to run the LRC as it stands) and would have done a lot of long-term damage to Olympic shooting in the UK.

The really heinous part wasn't the choice of somewhere other than Bisley, or even the dismantling of the range; it was that the range was leased and they can't distribute the equipment used to clubs around the country, which would have given a legacy from the Games to the sport. They couldn't even run the Nationals in the range because all the staff have to be hired in to run the range and the NSRA couldn't afford it.

BTW, on point 4, it wasn't the range inspector insisting on ground baffles from what I've been told, it was a shooter from the NASRPC who was acting as National Development Officer at the time.


12 Sep 2012 10:16
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Post Re: Firearms Training and Sporting Range Regulations
sparks wrote:
Sorry tac but point 3 there is wrong. You would have to had to rebuild the LRC to host the Games at Bisley, the floor vibrates too much, it doesn't have the spectator areas, and it's not up to the standard required for the World Championships or the Games in several other areas as well. And the financial cost associated with that new range would have broken the NSRA (it's killing them just to run the LRC as it stands) and would have done a lot of long-term damage to Olympic shooting in the UK.

The really heinous part wasn't the choice of somewhere other than Bisley, or even the dismantling of the range; it was that the range was leased and they can't distribute the equipment used to clubs around the country, which would have given a legacy from the Games to the sport. They couldn't even run the Nationals in the range because all the staff have to be hired in to run the range and the NSRA couldn't afford it.

BTW, on point 4, it wasn't the range inspector insisting on ground baffles from what I've been told, it was a shooter from the NASRPC who was acting as National Development Officer at the time.


Thank you for correcting me over point 3. However, in mitigation, IF the decision to use Bisley for the Olympic Games had been made a reality, then the £25MILLION spent building a range from nothing and to spend a further £15MILLION to remove it would have more than improved the present facilities - it would have provided a lasting legacy to shooting sports in this country and made Bisley the showcase place it always should have been.

Instead, there will be slightly-lumpy couple of acres of squeaky-new turf on Woolwich Common, and a couple more surprised-looking trees that must be wondering WTF they were doing there.

Just imagine what YOU could do with FIFTY MILLION EUROS to spend on a shooting facility!!

tac


12 Sep 2012 12:44
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Post Re: Firearms Training and Sporting Range Regulations
Quote[Tac] 3. ALL of this could have been accomplished at Bisley with no modifications to the facilities there.

Quote[Tac] Thank you for correcting me over point 3. However, in mitigation, IF the decision to use Bisley for the Olympic Games had been made a reality, then the £25MILLION spent building a range from nothing and to spend a further £15MILLION to remove it would have more than improved the present facilities - it would have provided a lasting legacy to shooting sports in this country and made Bisley the showcase place it always should have been.

Plus 1 Tac.

Sparks re above even if there had to be modifications made at Bisley or any other range that would have been suitable, they would still be there for future use and the Government could have recouped monies back from the facility over a number of years. The way it was done was a no brainer, some one some where is making money out of it.

Sikamick


12 Sep 2012 13:53
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Post Re: Firearms Training and Sporting Range Regulations
Great loss for sporting tourism is these days of recession.

Reference point 4: presumably the decision made by the officer in charge was based on their first-hand experience gained attending well known target shooting establishments, outside the jurisdiction. Bisley shooting complex - and the many ranges closer to home - in Northern Ireland. As as matter of interest, only if you know - did they have on the ground knowledge of the target shooting scene in Canada while in pursuit of a suitable standard.

Range Regulations:
http://www.irishstatutebook.ie/2011/en/si/0622.html


12 Sep 2012 14:11
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Post Re: Firearms Training and Sporting Range Regulations
Sikamick wrote:
Plus 1 Tac.

No, just incorrect. The LRC was built with commonwealth games funding - and it's nearly killed the NSRA to keep the place open. They aren't renting space to weddings and hockey teams for fun; facilities like that cost money to run, money they don't have.
Don't believe me?
Look at Wolf Creek. Look at Sydney. Look at Athens. None of the ranges have survived, because they're too expensive to run as one single range.
Now if they'd split up the kit and shipped it to clubs all over, that would have worked....


12 Sep 2012 20:33
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Post Re: Firearms Training and Sporting Range Regulations
When I asked what was happening to the shooting setup at the Olympics I was told the structure has been sold to the hosts of the 2016 Olympics and the electronic targetry was going to the Middle East for whatever reason....

So much for a sporting legacy in that area.

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12 Sep 2012 20:34
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Post Re: Firearms Training and Sporting Range Regulations
Blackadder wrote:
Great loss for sporting tourism is these days of recession.

Reference point 4: presumably the decision made by the officer in charge was based on their first-hand experience gained attending well known target shooting establishments, outside the jurisdiction. Bisley shooting complex - and the many ranges closer to home - in Northern Ireland. As as matter of interest, only if you know - did they have on the ground knowledge of the target shooting scene in Canada while in pursuit of a suitable standard.

Range Regulations:
http://www.irishstatutebook.ie/2011/en/si/0622.html



BA, as you may recall from the original thread long back, AFAIK there was no ground-walking in Canada with regard to the range standards. Had there been, they would have soon noted that not a single new range or even a refurbished range bore any resemblance to the farcical arrangements that have cost so much money in Ireland - unnecessarily so, IMO.

tac


12 Sep 2012 20:37
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Post Re: Firearms Training and Sporting Range Regulations
In my opinion, noone in the NASRPC Committee at that period in time knew bugger all about range standards.


15 Sep 2012 23:56
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Post Re: Firearms Training and Sporting Range Regulations
kryten wrote:
In my opinion, noone in the NASRPC Committee at that period in time knew bugger all about range standards.



Ah, right.

So nothing's changed now, then?

tac


16 Sep 2012 19:56
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Post Re: Firearms Training and Sporting Range Regulations
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https://www.facebook.com/NRBAI


planked, pee gravel your only man :shock: http://www.dnv.org/upload/documents/Cou ... /00371.pdf


20 Oct 2012 21:54
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Post Re: Firearms Training and Sporting Range Regulations
kryten wrote:
In my opinion, noone in the NASRPC Committee at that period in time knew bugger all about range standards.


Murray Gardner ;)
Firearms Instructor and Safety Consultant
PO BOX 78044 Port Coquitlam BC
V3B 7H5

http://mdgardner.com/
http://mdgardner.com/bio.htm



Murray "DOC" Gardner has over 37 years of experience in competitive pistol shooting, as well as an extensive training and firearms background. He is one of the co-founders of the International Practical Shooting Confederation (IPSC) in Canada and has won ten National titles in addition to North American & Pan American Champion titles.

Murray has a working knowledge of all aspects of the firearms field. As the Development Coordinator and Executive Director of the BC Federation of Shooting Sports for over nine years, he has trained and certified over 160 hunter education instructors in the firearms component of CORE.

He has also been involved with the Canadian Firearms Safety Course (CFSC) with the contractor to the Justice Department, where he worked as the Head Technical Consultant for the student handbooks as well as the script, production and editing of the video to accompany both handbooks.

DOC's teaching experience includes training and instructing over 200 of the CFSC/CRFSC Master Instructors across Canada. Between 1998 and 2000, he trained over 280 Canada Customs officers in the CFSC/CRFSC courses. To date, he has trained over forty Instructors and certified over 3,500 students in BC.

As well as teaching almost 200 students each year, Murray Gardner maintains his successful competitive shooting and coaching career. After taking many Canadian Champion titles, he has been the Champion, or runner up for the last 7 years in the Senior and/or Super Senior Category in IPSC Standard Division.

35 Years of Championship Titles
2012 Super Senior 2nd Place, IPSC Canada Open Division, Class Champion
2012 Top Super Senior, IPSC BC Open Division, 5th Overall for 2012 Open Division
2012 1st Super Senior, President's Medal, Provincials, IPSC BC Open Division
2011 1st Super Senior Provincials, IPSC BC Open Division
2011 Super Senior 2nd Place, IPSC Canada Standard Division
2010 2nd Super Senior Provincials, IPSC BC Standard Division
2010 Super Senior 2nd Place, IPSC Canada Standard Division
2009 Super Senior National Champion, IPSC Canada Standard Division
2008 Super Senior National Champion, IPSC Canada Standard Division
2007 Senior National Champion, IPSC Canada Standard Division
2006 Senior 2nd Place, IPSC Canada Standard Division
2006 3rd Overall Provincials, IPSC BC Standard Division
2005 Senior National Champion, IPSC Canada Standard Division
2005 Provincial Champion, IPSC BC Standard Division
2005 2nd Overall Provincials, IPSC BC Standard Division
2004 Senior 3rd Place, IPSC Canada Standard Division
2003 Senior National Champion, IPSC Canada Standard Division
2003 Provincial Champion, IPSC BC Standard Division
2003 Senior Provincial Champion, IPSC BC Standard Division
2002 Senior National Champion, IPSC Canada Standard Division
2002 Provincial Champion, IPSC BC Standard Division
2002 Senior Provincial Champion, IPSC BC Standard Division
2001 Senior Champion, IPSC USPSA Area #1 Standard Division
2001 Senior 2nd Place, IPSC Canada Standard Division
2000 Senior National Champion, IPSC Canada Standard Division
2000 Senior North American Champion, IPSC Standard Division
2000 Senior Pan American Champion, IPSC Standard Division
1999 Senior National Champion, IPSC Canada Open Division
1989 National Champion, CPSC Canada
1978-1985 National Champion, IPSC Canada


21 Oct 2012 15:36
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Post Re: Firearms Training and Sporting Range Regulations
http://www.dnv.org/upload/documents/Cou ... /00371.pdf

I find this report very interesting and well worth taken on board from a range officers point of view, firearms training and supervision on the range are a must to help avoid these problems.

Sikamick


21 Oct 2012 17:04
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Post Re: Firearms Training and Sporting Range Regulations
Very informative considering where the facts come from..

Reply in from tac to the above.

Quote:
As we all know, the direction in which a bullet is discharged is entirely down to the shooter - but here are the rules covering the use of a rifle - they are to be the main points observed by the RCO in carrying out his DUTIES as an RCO on any live-firing range -


1. The RCO IS to ensure that any firearm is LOADED with the firearm parallel to the ground, under the full control of the shooter, and within the 17 mil safety angle of the range confines.


2. The RCO AND THE SHOOTER are to ensure that AT NO TIME does the line of sight of the firearm intrude into open space above or to the side of the target backstop.


3. The RCO AND THE SHOOTER are to ensure that the safe handling of the firearm is entailed in the direction in which it is being aimed.


4. At ALL times, whilst on the firing point, the firearm must be controlled by the shooter and aimed in the direction of the target backstop and NOT at the ground between the firing point and the target backstop.


5. Whilst being loaded with ammunition, the firearm must be pointing in the direction of the target and under the full control of the shooter - one hand of the shooter MUST be controlling the direction of the firearm at all times.


You can see that the aiming of the gun is a matter of the shooter getting it right from the very first pick-up, and that the RCO MUST be keeping an eye on him or her to ensure this safe angle is being maintained.


The resulting good shot is a combination of teamwork between the RCO and the shooter, both of whom are constantly aware of the direction in which the gun is pointing at all times.
I've been shooting on ranges in UK and NI, Germany, Switzerland, Finland, Cyprus and Turkey, the USA and Canada, on and off, since I was about ten years old. I'm now 66.


Apart from the example I found of a range in Canada with ground baffles, and the one in the RoI, I've never seen another such range anywhere.


Certainly, here in the UK there are none like this, and, indeed, there could not be, as 'the inclusion of any structure on the ground intended to interfere with or to serve to alter the

path of a projectile discharged from the adjacent firing point is to be actively discouraged by the inspection personnel. Overhead baffles [of the type described in blah blah blah are

to be installed where there is an assessed dangre of a projectile departing the range at an angle sufficient to take it outside the dimensions of the safety template for that particular

range.' Home Office guidance to the inspection of live-firing rifle and pistol ranges in the United Kingdom.....


Please feel free to pass this on...


Best


tac



Quote:
'The inclusion of any structure on the ground intended to interfere with or to serve to alter the path of a projectile discharged from the adjacent firing point is to be actively discouraged by the inspection personnel'.


This must be taken from the world standard JSP403 for ranges quote above? Still in use by our defence forces after a major overhaul of our military ranges a number of years ago by UK range safety specialists. I believe they use it because the JSP403 offers the best all round standard for military/civilian firing ranges. On the other hand our Canadian adopted range regulations can be it seems, significantly different under certain conditions. In the south of Ireland our target shooters likewise are expected to be as responsible with firearms regardless of the type of regulation.
Ranges by their narure should in theory provoide safe areas, to zero, practice and compete in target matches. The above piece mentions ground bafflling, which is another means of helping to elimate or control potential deflections from projectiles angled away at a spefic angle after striking the bafffle for example. The quoted expert range consultant to the Canadian department justice, and in several other examples, goes on to describes several discrepancies of the safety benfits expected with such ground erected devices. An old axiom comes to mind which says expect the unexpected, also known colloquially as Murphy's law. To translate the theory, if for example any target shooter begins to walk their shots to get on paper while zeroring, or they were not sure of their elevation at the beginning of the target session, they may end-up, placing a number of sighter shots low. Here unfortunately if unlucky, target shooters may find their RO decides, they had their first and last shot of the day - a result of striking the ground baffle perhaps? The JSP403 it seems, is more forgiving, which allows for projectiles striking lower within the area of the backstop, because the projectile has no object close to it's flight path on route to the target. After all isn't it why ranges are built in the first place.


22 Oct 2012 17:29
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Post Re: Firearms Training and Sporting Range Regulations
Jeff Copper,86 died 2006. takes a while but good stuff great obversions http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VGYttXa0d1k
Annual Meeting of the Doctors for Disaster Preparedness held in San Diego, California; June 1997 :mrgreen:


30 Dec 2013 19:04
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Post Re: Firearms Training and Sporting Range Regulations
Range safety rules here in the yUK state -

'Show gun clear by -

a. Remove magaine - where detachable - and then

b. Insert a breech flag or

c. Remove the bolt.

I guess that rules are more or less the same most everywhere.

tac


08 Jan 2014 15:54
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