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Age Classification of Firearms 
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Joined: 31 Mar 2009 11:37
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Post Age Classification of Firearms
As a rough guide to the age classification of a particular firearm is to go by the date when it was first designed. CMP Vintage Rifle Matches as an example use the one Vintage classification. See CMP vintage rifle rules (USA). HBSA (UK) apply rules broken down by categories of firearms when first designed. Either way it amounts to a whole lot of history. Most of these rifles are fired in long range competitions or at shorter ranges in mixed matches depending on the level of experience.

Antique, Historical, Vintage, Classic, Veteran, Post -War Veteran, Sniper Rifle/with Optic, Replica Firearm (few originals available). Open Classification Firearms: Changes at variance to the original specifications when first issued or sold until the last date of manufacture, i.e. the addition of target sights, diopter sights, scopes, non standard ammunition and parts, Post Veteran WW1-WW2 conversions to Target Rifle...etc etc!


Note the use of Post Veteran Breech Loaders and Transition Class of firearms, another way of describing later or modern firearms.
viewtopic.php?f=3&t=1381

The muzzle loaders used are typically Enfield or Springfield muskets, and Pedersoli or Parker Hale reproductions of Gibb’s, Whitworth’s, etc.


The Vintage breech loaders used are the Chassepot, Huskvarna 1873, Marlin, Martini Henry, Remington Rolling Block, Snider Enfield, Springfield Trapdoor, Winchester, etc.


The Classic breech loaders used are the German and Swedish Mauser, Lebel, Long and Short Lee Enfield, Mosin Nagant M91/30, P14, P17, Ross, Springfield 1903, Schmidt Rubin G96/11 etc.

The Veteran breech loaders used are the Garand M1, German Mauser K98, Lee Enfield No.4 and No.5, Mosin Nagant M38, Schmidt Rubin K31 etc.

The Post Veteran breech loaders used are the Accuracy International, AR15 clone, CZ, Howa, Remington 700, Savage, Steyr, TIGR SVD, Tikka, etc.



Categorie examples of firearms, by date when first designed.

Vintage and Early Classic ( pre-1888) with Iron sights ( BP and Smokeless)
Classic ( pre 1919) i.e. Long Lee, SMLEs
Veteran ( 1919-1945)
Post Veteran ( 1946-1960)
Sniper(scoped rifle)


25 Jan 2013 13:04
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Joined: 31 Mar 2009 19:10
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Location: Eastern UK, Oregon USA and Ontario Canada
Post Re: Age Classification of Firearms
A very useful post.

TVM

tac


07 Feb 2013 20:18
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Joined: 24 Dec 2011 12:21
Posts: 80
Post Ruger 10/22
Produced :1964–present
Number built :over 5 million
So is the Ruger 10/22 classed as a classic rifle ?


10 May 2013 09:42
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Joined: 31 Mar 2009 19:10
Posts: 1845
Location: Eastern UK, Oregon USA and Ontario Canada
Post Re: Ruger 10/22
whydave wrote:
Produced :1964–present
Number built :over 5 million
So is the Ruger 10/22 classed as a classic rifle ?


Basically, it's a take on the M1 carbine design by 'Carbine' Smith, so it's an adaptation of a centre-fire carbine to rimfire. Defining 'classic' is a tricky one, and fraught with the chance of peeing in somebody's hat, but I'd say that it isn't a classic rifle per se. You would be at a distinct disadvantage shooting it at 300m/yds at An Riocht.

tac


10 May 2013 10:28
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Joined: 06 Jun 2009 09:39
Posts: 951
Post Re: Ruger 10/22
whydave wrote:
Produced :1964–present
Number built :over 5 million
So is the Ruger 10/22 classed as a classic rifle ?


Brilliant question !

If the date of conception/initial manufacture is used to determine eligibility and AR15 type rifles are allowed, then it should be :o


10 May 2013 16:36
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Post Re: Age Classification of Firearms
The date of manufacture for Classic Rifle eligibility for 'competition shooting' is a fullbore rifle from the period just prior to the outbreak of the first world war. In countries with large amounts of licensed firearms, it can be feasible to hold competitions in an exact date of design category.

Quote:
Produced :1964–present
Number built :over 5 million
So is the Ruger 10/22 classed as a classic rifle


A hunting rifle can become such a rifle,i.e. centerfire Winchester Model 70, pre 64 action concidered one of the great 'classic rifles' because of the repuation it deservedly gained after it had ceased production.


Quote:
Eligibility of AR15 type rifles

AR15 type rifles - semi-auto/stright pull. In the united states they compete in SR National match shooting. In the UK, made originally as true stright-pull rifles, they compete in NRA high power matches or under a mixed designation such as post veteran, depending where the line gets drawn..


10 May 2013 20:33
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Joined: 31 Mar 2009 19:10
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Location: Eastern UK, Oregon USA and Ontario Canada
Post Re: Age Classification of Firearms
In the British Vintage Arms Association, the date of 1933 is taken as the cut-off date or modern-era firearms, just about every type had been desinged and put into use by this time.

Obviously, semi-auto centre-fires are excepted from this - the Garand did not enter ANY kind of service until after 1936, so the date is a realistic one where any manually-operated long arm is taken into consideration that is NOT one of the freaky and the only-in-UK straight-pull monsters.

tac


10 May 2013 21:38
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Joined: 06 Jun 2009 09:39
Posts: 951
Post Re: Age Classification of Firearms
So, in short, the rules are whatever 'someone' decides they are.


11 May 2013 12:28
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Joined: 31 Mar 2009 11:37
Posts: 1789
Post Re: Age Classification of Firearms
At club/national level someone may decide to adapt formal rules to make a disiplin more accessable.
Nations who prized marksmanship from the first formal target matches held in Eichstäat, Bavaria, in 1477 had match rules - which evolved from the first collective collaborations of those early shooting matches. That's not to say an individual target shooter won't decide to create a new shooting sport to suit their needs and in the process make it a popular new disiplin.. Canadian Farky Farquharson.


Quote:
F-Class was officially started in Canada by George "Farky" Farquharson, who was a railway man who was one of the most skilled debaters of his day. Sitting at Franny Moore’s place, the late George Farquharson of Kamloops B.C. and a group of fullbore prone shooters talked about the concept some 20 years ago, in approximately 1986. Farquharson figured, that older shooters would be able to continue long-range shooting longer if their eyesight and bodies could be augmented by allowing them to use a scope and a rest to shoot, allowing these shooters to continue shooting along side of the people they had been competing with for most of their lives.



Early Target Shooting - "A Swiss painting from 1504 shows a rifle shooting setup that is quite modern. Contestants fire from enclosed and covered shooting booths at targets in the background. Each target is flanked by a small hut in which a target marker would be concealed during shooting and would later signal by a staff or pole to the shooter and the judges the value of the hit. The judges and scorekeepers are in the right foreground at a table under a roof. Several wind flags are flying, and spectators are shown".

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/top ... 6/shooting


11 May 2013 20:54
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Joined: 31 Mar 2009 19:10
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Location: Eastern UK, Oregon USA and Ontario Canada
Post Re: Age Classification of Firearms
As ever, when you ARE the national association, YOU make the rules -

HBSA UK Course of Fire -

Classic & Veteran Rifle Long Range Open Championships
INTRODUCTION: All firearms must be appropriately licensed and be “in proof” for the ammunition to be used. (Note recent concern over 7.62mm NATO/.308 Win. rifles with Lee-Enfield actions)

COMPETITORS: Members and Non-Members of the HBSA

MATCH CONDITIONS:
As HBSA Rules 1995. However, orthoptic accessories, a two-point or “as issued” sling and a padded glove may specifically be used in all Matches
A wrist rest is permitted for the “Freemantle” and the “McBride”
The backsight of a Service Rifle may be adjusted laterally and the bar reverse
Vintage Rifles designed for use with Blackpowder as propellant are not permitted
No HME rifles (ME greater than 4500 J / 3319 ft.lb) are permitted without approval
Competitors must produce a NRA Safety & Competency Certificate before they will be permitted to shoot
COURSE OF FIRE:
At each distance (900 & 1000 yards), up to five ranging shots until the target is first hit: this hit constitutes the first of three convertible sighters. Fifteen shots to count. Information from the butts on the fall of shot may be given, but only until the first hit.


MATCH I: The “Fremantle” for Classic and Veteran Match Rifles.

MATCH II: The “Varley” for Classic Service Rifles (pre-1919, as issued).

MATCH III: The “Ommundsen” for Classic Service Target Rifles (pre-1919, contemp. tgt. sights)

MATCH IV: The “Crossman” for Veteran Service Rifles (1919-1946, as issued).

MATCH V: The “Brigadier Barlow” for Veteran Service Target Rifles (1919-1945, target sights).

MATCH VI: The “McBride” for Classic & Veteran Service Sniping Rifles (as issued).

MATCH VII: The “Raufoss” for Post-Veteran First Generation 7.62mm Target Rifles (using bolt-action Service Rifle pattern actions, iron sights, non-iris fixed height foresights, conventional (not thumbhole) stocks: hand-stops and single-point slings permitted).

Please notice that the vast majority of firearms here are either military or former military - commercial firearms are virtually ignored. Besides which, MOST commercial long arms are actually based on military designs when you think about it.

Ignoring the likes of Blaser/Mauser/Lynx and their odd but effective variants on the straight-pull action, which cannot in all seriousness be called classic designs - they simply haven't been around long enough to qualify...unlike the straight-pull Mannlichers [1895], Schmidt-Rubin [1889] and Ross [1905]. Can there be any doubt that these last three are classics each in their own right?

tac


11 May 2013 21:18
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