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IS A RELOADING ROOM AN EXPLOSION HAZARD 
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Post Re: IS A RELOADING ROOM AN EXPLOSION HAZARD
Three of the most volatile products found in the domestic environment are without question, highly dangerous in the wrong hands. Vehicles & petrol also stored for grass cutting, etc and bottles of liquid gas. Combined or separated, they make an explosive mixture, where as, smokeless propellant does not.
Hopefully one day, our old British 'Blackpowder' Explosives act of 1875 - shall be revised, taking into account, modern devolopments that proceeded pre 1900s thinking. That understands the storage requirements of various types of shooters propellant, placing them in a progressive order of danger, or lack of, as the case may be.. Under UN classification - low-grade hazardous material for transporting goods, air & road.

Demo of various types of propellant showing their different burn rates..

Black Powder vs. Modern Smokeless Powder
http://youtu.be/lIsvVFeEZsg


03 Mar 2014 14:35
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Post Re: IS A RELOADING ROOM AN EXPLOSION HAZARD
Quote:
highly dangerous in the wrong hands


:shock:

Bullitt - The Chase (Part 2)
http://youtu.be/wk9SZbrh_Tg
shock:


04 Mar 2014 12:59
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Post Re: IS A RELOADING ROOM AN EXPLOSION HAZARD
Mobile phone makers caution against potentially explosive atmospheres. Men stand by the car waiting for the tank to fill. Woman clothing generate static boom :mrgreen:


04 Mar 2014 17:48
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Post Re: IS A RELOADING ROOM AN EXPLOSION HAZARD
Whaddyado Static Electricity Explosion http://youtu.be/b89x8CAS6xU
http://youtu.be/gct1BmKNvU0, http://youtu.be/1tYO4jvnJHw

CCTV Shows Why You Shouldnt Smoke In A Petrol Station http://youtu.be/C6VHqFgOA6I
http://youtu.be/7OhnMnAiwM8

Mobile phones cause airplanes to crash http://youtu.be/8L3t_KshBAc

Propane cylinders explode http://youtu.be/FDqeMLhmqrE


04 Mar 2014 19:13
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Post Re: IS A RELOADING ROOM AN EXPLOSION HAZARD
The next accident I hear about where home-loading is concerned will be the first one I've EVER heard about in over forty years.

tac


04 Mar 2014 19:47
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Post Re: IS A RELOADING ROOM AN EXPLOSION HAZARD
mobile phone blows up shed :shock:

would ya reload outdoors on the bench with a hand press tac ;)
http://youtu.be/bf_D4_ymoJ4

cheap and cheerful does the job :lol:
Lee Breech Lock Hand Press Portable Outdoor Reloading Kit
http://youtu.be/7kHgzkWoS64
http://youtu.be/kkZ0eue9te
improve your accuracy as the actress said to the bishop :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
http://youtu.be/hW-kpx1rTnc


05 Mar 2014 10:37
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Post Re: IS A RELOADING ROOM AN EXPLOSION HAZARD
Reload in private without noise where there's no distractions. Distracted loading is like driving and talking on the mobile
Take nothing for granted you get away with it for a while until it catches up
While loading keep focus, check on a regular basis
Dont reload when tired. you'll get sloppy
Never reload in a hurry


05 Mar 2014 12:51
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Post Re: IS A RELOADING ROOM AN EXPLOSION HAZARD
Good advice & common sense approach, little to worry about.
Maybe the time has come to approach Canada yet again for a second time. They allowed Ireland copy much of their range standards (offered free of charge) plus terminology & phrases, - Non-Restricted, Restricted and Grandfathered. It transpired, restricted in Canada, means not the same thing as a restricted firearm here and for that matter certain other items pertaining to their regulation menu deemed ineffective.. in Canada..
Canada recently updated the "1985" explosive act current to 2014-02-06, last amended on 2014-02-01
We could concider looking the 2014 act worded in plain English & French. Handloading it seems, was covered by a paragraph's worth of details, out of aprox 44 pages in total covering the 2014 explosives act.

Notes :see coming into force provision and notes, where applicable.
Shaded provisions are not in force

CANADIAN Explosives Act (R.S.C., 1985, c. E-17)
http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/E-17/

Handloading is legal in Canada. The Explosives Act places limits on the amount of powder (either smokeless or black) that may be stored and on how much powder may be available for use at any time. The Act is the responsibility of Natural Resources Canada. If the quantity of powder stored for personal use exceeds 75 kg recently increased to (225 kg) then a Propellant Magazine Licence (Type P) is required. There is no limit on the number of primers that may be stored for non-commercial use.

What public safety concerns will these new regulations resolve? Explosives Branch has very little concern over handloading activities. Hence, the significantly increased limits.

Why can’t the old regulations fix these public safety concerns? As stated earlier, the old regs are full of "reasonable quantity" type terminology. We all know how "reasonable" can be interpreted by arresting officers and judges and today, there is no"reasonable" in courtrooms or legislation. This re-write spells it out clearly and removes arbitrary interpretation of those terms.

Why will the new regulations will be better for gun owners than the old regulations? Greatly increased limits for all combustible handloading components with the exception of a small reduction in black powder (in multi-unit dwellings), and a much clearer understanding of limits and requirements.
How much it will cost to implement the new regulations? It shouldn't cost anything. Little is required of handloaders that they aren't already doing. As for the government's costs, it would be minimal. There is no new infrastructure or enforcement.


Extract from the new SI (handloading)
The Regulations also address the issue of reloading (or hand loading) cartridges at s. 35 (Part IV):

Quote:
“safety cartridge” means a cartridge for any shotgun, gun, rifle, pistol, revolver and industrial gun the case of which can be extracted after firing and that is so closed as to prevent any explosion in one cartridge being communicated to another cartridge but does not include tracer, incendiary, high explosive or other similar military type cartridges;

The Regulations address the storage of ammunition in Part XI (“Storage and Handling of Ammunition and Fireworks”). According to s. 125 of the Regulations, the maximum amount of “explosives contained in ammunition” that can be stored is 225 kg.


35. Any person may, in respect of safety cartridges, load at a place other than a licensed factory if
(a) the loaded safety cartridges are not for sale or for any commercial, industrial or business use;
(b) the explosive used to load the cartridges is kept or stored in accordance with the provisions of Part XIII;
(c) not more than two kilograms of explosives, other than safety cartridges, are kept in the place;

Accordingly, reloading is perfectly legal as long as the storage and handling requirements of the Explosives Act (and Regulations) are followed.


05 Mar 2014 16:19
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Post Re: IS A RELOADING ROOM AN EXPLOSION HAZARD
I suppose anyone with a grain of common sense decides to reload in a safe environment, once they learn how to do the basics in a repeatable manner. Ritual & routine in a space free of clutter to ensure the least possibility of ever encountering the small chance of loading with the wrong components, belonging to another caliber.

Quite pocket size, lowest costing unit..
http://youtu.be/9-tzaULt1rs


05 Mar 2014 18:33
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Post Re: IS A RELOADING ROOM AN EXPLOSION HAZARD
Again with that *&%^$£^£$ word 'EXPLOSIVE' -

35. Any person may, in respect of safety cartridges, load at a place other than a licensed factory if
(a) the loaded safety cartridges are not for sale or for any commercial, industrial or business use;
(b) the explosive used to load the cartridges is kept or stored in accordance with the provisions of Part XIII;
(c) not more than two kilograms of explosives, other than safety cartridges, are kept in the place;

Nitro-cellulose propellant is categorically NOT an explosve - it is a PROPELLANT. That is why it is called a propellant, and that is why the manufacturers call it a propellant, and that is why the H&S authorities of every country on the planet call it a propellant.

Except the RoI, of course, where the laws of physics are suspended or ignored to make politicians happy.

tac


06 Mar 2014 09:20
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Post Re: IS A RELOADING ROOM AN EXPLOSION HAZARD
1875 was a long time ago -
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zxzRy1Tcmp4

U Load offers a promising introduction for getting started on the premises of your secure local gun dealer.
In a recession it would be of benefit to assist firearms dealers stay in business. In Ireland they can in 'theory' apply for a propellant storage license.


06 Mar 2014 14:26
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Post Re: IS A RELOADING ROOM AN EXPLOSION HAZARD
Just like to point out, in case of any confunglement, that here in the mainland of UK [you'll note that NI IS different] you do not have to show your firearms certificate to buy PROPELLANT of any kind, except for the first time.

However, you DO have to have a [free] explosives license to buy, transport and keep BLACK POWDER, which IS a Class 1 Explosive under the Act.

In USA you need no certificates/licenses to buy either.

Obviously, you can't just waltz into any gun store and buy propellant if they have never seen you before - they need to see that you ARE actually authorised to use the stuff to reload your ammunition, or make it from scratch. Also, you have to show your FAC the first time you buy primers, so that the store keeper/dealer can see that you are authorised to buy large primers, fer instance. I can, since ALL my reloading uses large rifle primers. Sooooooooooooooooo, I cannot buy SMALL rifle primers, as I do not have anything that size to reload. Same for pistol primers - small for me with my .357Mag, so no large - I don't have a .44cal anything.

I hope that makes it less confusing.

tac


29 Mar 2014 17:57
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Post Re: IS A RELOADING ROOM AN EXPLOSION HAZARD
Licensed black-powder specialists in Ireland would know how to go about obtaining various items made available under the old explosive act.

http://www.justice.ie/en/JELR/Public%20 ... 202010.pdf

Quote:
Explosives are regulated under the Explosives Act 1875 and associated Explosives Regulations; see the General Guidance Notes - Explosives Legislation (PDF - 134KB) for details.

Explosives are strictly controlled and a person may not import, store or manufacture explosives without a license Transport and sale of explosives is also controlled by regulations.

Explosives include:

commercial or industrial explosives (such as detonators, boosters, detonating cord, ANFO and cartridged explosives)

propellants (such as shooter’s powder, black powder)

pyrotechnics (such as marine distress flares, industrial pyrotechnic cartridges and fireworks)

Certain substances such as ammonium nitrate, sodium chlorate, potassium nitrate and sodium nitrate also come under the control of the explosives regulations, as they are deemed to be explosives for the purposes of the Act.

Use of explosives is not controlled by the Explosives Act, but is regulated by the Health and Safety Authority.

Storing Explosives

Under national explosives legislation, explosives must be stored in one of the following: a Licenced factory or Magazine, a Store (licensed by the local authority) or a Premises Registered for keeping explosives.


Mode B
A substantial receptical or safe inside a dwelling house or public room. General limit = 22.68kg (50lbs) or double this if kept in a fireproof safe.

.d Keeping of Explosives for private use and not for sale.
Order in Council No 12 provides for a person to apply for a Garda Certificate (C49) that he is a fit person, to keep for private use, up to 10 lbs of an authorised explosive, for any industrial, agricultural, sporting or other special purpose, (as specified on the certificate). The certificate is valid for up to one year


21 Jun 2014 18:15
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Post Re: IS A RELOADING ROOM AN EXPLOSION HAZARD
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NVBlAjsWbzA

@2:20 - the then-world champion notes that 98% of everybody there [that's about 500 shooters] reload. Many of them reload in the back of their station wagon, as I do.

tac


21 Jun 2014 19:41
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Post Re: IS A RELOADING ROOM AN EXPLOSION HAZARD
Backstop Benny wrote:
BISLEY SHOOTING CENTER
http://youtu.be/seEV23eRB7A
4:10/4:38 o naturale on the bench :shock:
safe as a damp squibs, a bit of reloadin under the gazebo does away with fear of fuzzy wuzzies on the other bench eying your brass :lol: :lol:
Attachment:
The attachment outdoor gazebo tent.jpg is no longer available

http://www.ebay.com/bhp/outdoor-gazebo



UK, the requirements for reloading are simple -
1. A valid Firearms Certificate - FAC - with guns and their calibres entered on it, of course.
2. You show your FAC the first time you buy primers in the gun store - so the clerk can see that you
are entitled to buy, for instance, large rifle primers and/or small rifle primers - or large pistol primers/small pistol primers.
3. Somewhere to lock your powder away from prying eyes.
That's it.
Attachment:
reloading at the home range.jpg
reloading at the home range.jpg [ 81.29 KiB | Viewed 12857 times ]


Those who engage in Bench Rest shooting often buy their bullets AT the range shop - The Diggle range is famous for this - and they RELOAD on the BENCHES beside or behind the firing point.
No log-book is needed, except for you to record the performance details of the load that you are trying out. Nobody gives a flying f*ck about how many you make, providing you don't exceed the
amount on your FAC. For instance,
I can have 750 GP11, 500 .308, 500 7x57, 500 6.5 and 250 .45-70 - oh, and 1200 .22 and 700 357/38. All at the same time, if I had room.

Reloading manuals are quite expensive, so you are never going to get them for nothing, and anyway, getting something from the gubmint implies that they control it. Here, there is no control apart from that of keeping within your limit.
It takes about an hour to learn how to reload with safety - thereafter it's all a matter of getting on with it and doing it.
tac


08 Dec 2014 21:01
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Post Re: IS A RELOADING ROOM AN EXPLOSION HAZARD
Attachment:
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Picture and text sent by tac


The shooter it loading .338Lapua Magnum DOWN to the range limits.  Our range here limits you to shooting rifle calibres OVER .25" to 3280 fps and 5160 ft lbs.  Sub-.25cal can be shot faster - 3500 fps.
 
He is loading the 250gr JLK VLD bullet, which has the highest ballistic coefficient of ANY shoulder-fired bullet - .818.  His load is immaterial, since nobody in the RoI can use that information - the .338LM is not a target rifle load where you live, as it is here.
 
His powder is Reloader 25, and the digital scales and Horus ballistic calculator are right there with him.  We have a new magnetodynamic muzzle velocity chrono that simply fits on the end of muzzle and gives direct readings to the ballistic calculator by wi-fi.
 
The bright green item on the bracket mount is the RCBS pistol powder precision loader.  With a ball powder like Reloader it can deliver a very accurate base load [within a couple of grains] that you then make up with the powder trickler on the digital scales.
 
This is a regular set-up here for a few of us.  I've used an RCBS platen loading plate - it just clamps on to a Black & Decker workmate and you're good to go.  It holds the press and the powder dropper and auto-primer securely on the one basic alloy plate, which them clamps right on the the top of the work surface.
 
tac 


04 Jan 2015 20:39
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Post Re: IS A RELOADING ROOM AN EXPLOSION HAZARD
ecumenical matter for the vatican crowd benny :mrgreen:


24 Jun 2015 12:47
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Post Re: IS A RELOADING ROOM AN EXPLOSION HAZARD
That would be a separation of church and state matter, one for the legislative to decide on as a matter of debate from inside the Dáil chamber.
And something for individual stakeholders charged with supporting the interests for all forms of shooting sports.

As for Guidance on Explosives Legislation in light of the WG reloading recommendation.
The UK and Canada had a recent legislation change that 'increased' the amounts of Shooter's propellant and Black powder for an individual licensed for firearms, allowing them keep greater amounts of propellant safely at home. It would be unwarranted to think, the working group (WG) reloading proposal, was set-in-stone, in light of reliable published international HSA data showing what it is that determines the SAFETY properties of modern shooter's propellant.

It might be reasonable to assume, Mode B of our old British 1875 explosives act, used to determine the control of Black Powder - still remains in force here - where the "dwelling house or public room has the legal general limit = 22.68kg (50lbs) or double this if kept in a fireproof safe." In other jurisdictions, including the North of Ireland, they regulate in a positive manner for those with a firearms license looking to buy shooter's propellant. Black Powder propellant, on the other hand have regulations with an additional set of different controls, than what was proposed by the WG who consider both propellants - similar, requiring the same set of regulations for any proposed update of the 1875 explosives act. In the UK, an application is made for a free black powder certificate to acquire and another free certificate to transport, while safe shooter's powder is openly available to purchase from any RFD on proof of a firearms certificate.

The question must be asked as to the quality of advice and expertise the WG took for their limited reloading propsal?

Guidance Notes for Public on Explosives Legislation
Last revision 14 July 2014

http://www.justice.ie/en/JELR/GD%202010 ... 202014.pdf

Current Secondary legislation relating to Explosives (see Annex 1, pages 20 of 24)

Quote:
c) Registered Premises

Mode B: A substantial receptacle or safe inside a dwelling house or public room. General limit = 22.68kg (50lbs) or double this if kept in a fireproof safe.

d) Keeping of Explosives for private use and not for sale

9) Importation/Export of Explosives

a) Importation
Section 40.9 of the EA provides for the granting of an importation licence from the Minister for any explosive, and may include any conditions and restrictions as he sees fit for the protection of the public from danger.

Relevant Secondary Legislation
i) S.I. 115 of 1995 European communities (Placing on the Market and Supervision of Explosives for Civil Uses) requires that no explosives may be transferred (by way of import), unless the consignee applies
(Application Form is called a TD 3), to the recipient competent authority (The Minister) for approval of the transfer. Approval shall be by means of a recipient competent authority document (TD 4).

ii) S.I. No. 449 of 1994 (Import of Explosives Order) applies to all explosives except pyrotechnic articles, deemed explosives, and lifesaving devices in vehicles. It requires that no person shall import into the state any explosive unless the explosive is classified for transport in accordance with the UN Scheme of classification (as set out in the 8th revised edition (or later)
of the Recommendations prepared by the UN Committee of Experts on the Transport of Dangerous Goods), and,
 It conforms in composition, character and quality to the description in a cert of authorisation issued by the appropriate authority in the country of manufacture and which specifies the use or application for which the explosives is to be placed on the market, and,
 It has such security markings as may be directed by the Garda Siocháná.

iii) S.I. No 362 of 1993 European Communities (Acquisition and
Possession of Weapons and Ammunition) Regulations, 1993 gives effect to Council Directives 9 /77/EEC on transfers of ammunition and provide for European Firearms Pass and procedures for transfer of ammunitions and records to be kept by firearms dealers.

Order in Council No 12 provides for a person to apply for a Garda Certificate 2
that he is a fit person, to keep for private use, up to 10 lbs of an authorised explosive, for any industrial, agricultural, sporting or other special purpose, (as specified on the certificate). The certificate is valid for up to one year from date of issue..


12) Use of Explosives Note that the use of explosives (including pyrotechnics) in the workplace is regulated under Health and Safety legislation and not under the Explosives Act.
(See http://www.hsa.ie). The following legislation, inter alia, is relevant:
http://www.hsa.ie/eng/Topics/Explosives/


25 Jun 2015 16:18
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Post Re: IS A RELOADING ROOM AN EXPLOSION HAZARD
tac wrote:
Again with that *&%^$£^£$ word 'EXPLOSIVE' -

35. Any person may, in respect of safety cartridges, load at a place other than a licensed factory if
(a) the loaded safety cartridges are not for sale or for any commercial, industrial or business use;
(b) the explosive used to load the cartridges is kept or stored in accordance with the provisions of Part XIII;
(c) not more than two kilograms of explosives, other than safety cartridges, are kept in the place;

Nitro-cellulose propellant is categorically NOT an explosve - it is a PROPELLANT. That is why it is called a propellant, and that is why the manufacturers call it a propellant, and that is why the H&S authorities of every country on the planet call it a propellant.

Except the RoI, of course, where the laws of physics are suspended or ignored to make politicians happy.

tac

The above extract was from the 2014 revised Canadian update to the "1985" explosive act, current to 2014-02-06, last amended on 2014-02-01
In 2009, the Irish firearms act was an updated to reflect what was supposed to be a modern streamlined approach to the licensing of firearms.
Recommended apperently by our shooting representatives at the time, was the Canadian model of licensing firearms and range regulations, introducing into the vernacular : Non-Restricted, Restricted, Grandfathered and Ground-Baffles. Canada the home of the device now rendered obsolete and removed from firing ranges, having failed in many past known instances.
Had the shooting bodies and DoJ representatives, put boots-down on Canada soil, they may of had second thoughts about transposing the Canadian firearms regime back to Ireland.
We adopted selected parts from Canadian firearm regulations that suited and failed to include relevant counter-measures they use to allow restricted firearms on a PAL firearms license.
Reloading ammunition (at home) for Canadians is more or less the same as it is in any country that license firearms.
To conclude, Irish firearm and range regulations are of Canadian origin that had a corresponding update in 2014 to the revised explosive act, that had HUGH input from Canadian shooting orgs involved in drafting the act, for the benefit of sports shooters. The usual way firearm acts are assembled with some back-room consultation to chats and the exchange of technical information, during the early drafting stages - then transperently explored and explained before any final decision was reached.

Canadian revised 2014 explosives act:
Quote:
We could concider looking at the 2014 act, worded in plain English & French. Handloading in the new act was covered by a single paragraph's worth of details, out of aprox 44 pages in total covering the 2014 explosives act.


CANADIAN Explosives Act (R.S.C., 1985, c. E-17)
http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/E-17/

Handloading is legal in Canada. The Explosives Act places limits on the amount of powder (either smokeless or black) that may be stored and on how much powder may be available for use at any time. The Act is the responsibility of Natural Resources Canada. If the quantity of powder stored for personal use exceeds 75 kg recently increased to (225 kg) then a Propellant Magazine Licence (Type P) is required. There is no limit on the number of primers that may be stored for non-commercial use.

What public safety concerns will these new regulations resolve? Explosives Branch has very little concern over handloading activities. Hence, the significantly increased limits.

Why can’t the old regulations fix these public safety concerns? As stated earlier, the old regs are full of "reasonable quantity" type terminology. We all know how "reasonable" can be interpreted by arresting officers and judges and today, there is no"reasonable" in courtrooms or legislation. This re-write spells it out clearly and removes arbitrary interpretation of those terms.

Why will the new regulations will be better for gun owners than the old regulations? Greatly increased limits for all combustible handloading components with the exception of a small reduction in black powder (in multi-unit dwellings), and a much clearer understanding of limits and requirements.
How much it will cost to implement the new regulations? It shouldn't cost anything. Little is required of handloaders that they aren't already doing. As for the government's costs, it would be minimal. There is no new infrastructure or enforcement.


"In 1794 two Corkmen established the gunpowder mills on the banks of the River Lee, at Ballincollig, five miles from Cork city.
The gunpowder factory was in operation for over 100 years until it finally closed in 1903.
It is an example of one of Ireland's early chemical industries"

The Gunpowder Mills at Ballincollig exported Gunpowder to every corner of the globe - Dublin - Cork - Belfast, shooting & fishing tackle and gunpowder offices, selling to the shooting public in towns and cities, without opposition from the trade in fear of loosing a shilling from items never keep in stock, etc, etc.....

Attachment:
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Richard Kelly, gunpowder merchant, 56 Sackville street and Bachelor's-Walk, 1836

Martin Kelly and Son, fishing tackle manufacturers and gunpowder importers, 56 Lower Sackville Street and Bachelor's-Walk - before Easter 1916


03 Mar 2016 14:14
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Post Re: IS A RELOADING ROOM AN EXPLOSION HAZARD
cocky micro pecker contest :roll:

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04 Mar 2016 17:04
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